Foods High in Potassium

by Dr. Ben Lynch

Foods-High-in-Potassium

Before we discuss which foods are high in potassium, let's hit some key facts.

Fact #1

Potassium helps carry electrical signals to cells in your body and is critical to the proper functioning of nerve and muscle cells, particularly heart muscle cells.

The most common cause for this is loss in urine, due to water pills or diuretics. (These types of medications are often prescribed for people who have high blood pressure or heart disease.)

But it's also very common for low potassium to be caused by simply not getting enough in your diet.

Fact #2

99% of women and 90% of men are deficient in potassium.1

Fact #3
Every single day, adults should be consuming at least 4,700 mg of potassium. Children, age nine to thirteen, should be consuming at least 4,500 mg per day.2

In order to eat 4,700 mg of potassium, you need to know which foods are high in this mineral. Don't worry – the list of my favorites isn't long – it's a perfect ten! But I'll also give you the long list and how much potassium you can find in each item, to support your highest health.

By choosing foods high in potassium and low in sodium, you would actually be eating like our ancestors did.

It's worth noting that our ancestors also didn't die of chronic disease, like we do currently.

Dr. Lynch's Top 10 Foods High in Potassium 3, 4

  1. Russet Potatoes
  2. Beet Greens
  3. Pistachios
  4. Swiss Chard
  5. Potatoes
  6. Pomegranates
  7. Watermelon
  8. Prunes
  9. Adzuki Beans
  10. Coconut Water

(Scroll to the bottom of the article for the complete list of foods high in potassium.)

Top-10-Foods-High-in-Potassium(To download this infographic, click here!)

 

Unfortunately, eating foods high in potassium rarely occurs these days. There are a few reasons for that...

Reason #1

People are consuming foods higher in sodium and lower in potassium. This is because many people eat processed food versus fresh food.

Consuming more sodium than potassium may be associated with a significant number of chronic diseases.

Reason #2

Soils are depleted of minerals and vitamins with industrialized farming. Thus, foods that were once high in potassium, are now foods with lower potassium.

The list of foods in this article are not a perfect representation, as soils vary in their health and nutrient density.

By growing your own food, in high quality, nutrient dense soils, your foods are going to be higher in vitamins and minerals.

Reason #3

Many foods high in potassium are problematic for some people.

  • High histamine foods such as orange juice, yogurt, tomatoes, peanuts, fish, banana, avocados, and clams are not favorable for those with a dirty DAO enzyme or intolerant to histamine.
  • High carbohydrate or high sugar foods, such as any fruit or starchy vegetable, will not support those with weight issues or blood sugar imbalances.
  • High oxalate containing foods, such as spinach, beets, and beet greens are not helpful as high potassium foods, since many people cannot tolerate them.
  • Beans, of all types, may be hard to digest for some. Beans also contain phytates and lectins, which may cause other issues. (Phytates can bind to various minerals and deplete nutrients such as iron, zinc, manganese, and calcium. Lectins can cause gas, bloating, and weight gain.)
  • Avocado is extremely nutritious, but for those who cannot tolerate anything from the latex family, which also includes pistachios and bananas, they can be problematic.
  • Dairy is a common allergen and should not be consumed by those who experience problems. 
  • Nuts and seeds are a nice source of potassium, but they can be hard on the liver – especially for those who have a dirty PEMT gene.


Solution?

If you are someone who struggles with eating a number of foods high in potassium, we've got your back. I've formulated a potassium powder supplement!

Benefits of Optimal Potassium Powder:

  • 500 mg of potassium per serving
  • Alkaline form of potassium as potassium bicarbonate
  • Great taste using only natural flavors
  • Sugar-free
  • Mixes easily in water
  • Free of potassium citrate (which is more acidic and hard on the stomach)

Experience the benefits of supplementing with Optimal Potassium Powder by getting yours today – from Seeking Health!

What are people saying about Optimal Potassium Powder?

"I won't be without this potassium supplement. It is so hard to get enough potassium in your diet and this is an easy way to do it. Tastes great and I can feel a difference in my energy and activity tolerance. I've recommended it to my grandma who has a hard time taking the giant prescription potassium pills."  ~Hannah 

"Within seconds, literally, my head cleared of all fog and I had this very solid energy which felt like a strong coffee but without the jitteriness or anxiety."  ~Dr. Lynch

"I feel like my head is a lot clearer and my vision brighter. Man. That happened so fast. That's crazy."  ~Tasman Lynch (Dr. Lynch's 15 yr old son)

What are you going to experience with Optimal Potassium Powder?! 

It is recommended to try and consume whole foods that are high in potassium, and use Optimal Potassium Powder as a supplement to help you meet the recommended daily amount if you are not able to from diet alone.*

IMPORTANT: You must consume this product with 4-6 oz of water and take with food. Do NOT consume on an empty stomach. Do NOT exceed 1 serving per day. 

Optimal-Potassium-Powder-Lemon-Lime

Shop Optimal Potassium Powder

 

As promised, here is a full, trusted list providing common foods high in potassium: 3, 4

  • Potato, Russet baked with skin - 1 large (4" diameter) - 1644 mg
  • Beet greens, boiled, drained - 1 cup - 1309 mg
  • Pistachios, roasted - 1 cup - 1239 mg
  • Swiss chard, cooked - 1 cup - 961 mg
  • Potato, baked with skin - 1 medium - 926 mg
  • Pomegranate - 1 medium fruit - 665 mg
  • Watermelon - 2 wedges - 640 mg
  • Prunes - 1/2 cup - 637 mg
  • Adzuki beans, cooked - 1/2 cup - 612 mg
  • Coconut water - 1 cup - 600 mg
  • Raisins - 1/2 cup - 598 mg
  • Spanish peanuts - 1/2 cup - 570 mg
  • Almonds, roasted - 1/2 cup - 550 mg
  • Sunflower seeds, dry roasted - 1/2 cup - 544 mg
  • Sweet potato - 1 medium - 541 mg
  • Clams, canned - 3 ounces - 534 mg
  • Yogurt, plain, low-fat - 8 ounces - 579 mg
  • Durian, raw - 1 cup - 530 mg
  • Pumpkin seeds, dried - 1/2 cup - 522 mg
  • Prune juice - 6 ounces - 528 mg
  • Beets, cooked - 1 cup - 518 mg
  • Carrot juice - 6 ounces - 517 mg
  • Sockeye salmon with skin, smoked - 1 filet - 518 mg
  • Figs, dried - 1/2 cup - 507 mg
  • Halibut, cooked - 3 ounces - 490 mg
  • Apricots, dried - 6 pieces - 488 mg
  • Avocado - 1/2 medium - 487 mg
  • Tomato paste - 3 Tablespoons - 486 mg
  • Lima beans, cooked - 1/2 cup - 485 mg
  • Sun-dried tomatoes - 1/4 cup - 463 mg
  • Acorn squash, cooked - 1/2 cup - 448 mg
  • Cod, cooked - 3 ounces - 439 mg
  • Banana - 1 medium - 422 mg
  • Spinach, cooked - 1/2 cup - 420 mg
  • Tomato juice - 6 ounces - 417 mg
  • Peaches, dehydrated - 1/4 cup - 398 mg
  • Milk, non-fat - 1 cup - 382 mg
  • Pork chop, cooked - 3 oz - 382 mg
  • Cantaloup - 1/4 medium - 368 mg
  • Honeydew melon - 1/8 melon - 365 mg
  • Split peas, cooked - 1/2 cup - 355 mg
  • Yogurt, Plain, whole milk - 8 ounces - 352 mg
  • Artichoke, cooked - 1 medium - 343 mg
  • Edamame, cooked in pod - 1/2 cup - 340 mg
  • Turkey breast, cooked - 100 grams - 320 mg
  • Black beans, cooked - 1/2 cup - 305 mg
  • Tomato - 1 medium - 292 mg
  • Butternut squash, cooked - 1/2 cup - 291 mg
  • Orange juice - 6 ounces - 237 mg


 
Sources:

  1. "5 Potassium." Institute of Medicine. 2005. Dietary Reference Intakes for Water, Potassium, Sodium, Chloride, and Sulfate. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10925
  2. Linus Pauling Institute – Potassium
  3. USDA Food Composition Database – Potassium
  4. Health.gov, Food Sources of Potassium

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Results not typical of product use.

Topics: Supplementation, Nutrition, Potassium

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